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Comments from Our Visitors
and Brix Pix
--Page 2--
(November 2006 - June 2007)

Brands and yards mentioned on ths page include:
TIDEWATER, TUTTLE, THURBER, ACME FERRIS, ASARCO, SNOWBALL, MAYONE, WASHBURN, [star] B, A.E.A., A.B.C., ALDRIDGE , CALVERT, COLE, SBCo, H&W, Anglo Saxon, HEARTH & BOSH, EXCELSIOR, BENEZET, DON.B Co, DONNELLY, GRAVES, DUNN PATENT, S.C.M.CO, Walter F. B. Gurnee, J J J, ALTA, S B Co, Worcester Brick Co., O.B.& M.C, Hibberd Brick Company, SLIGO, Buffalo (Kansas) Brick Plant, Acme Brick Co., KOOKEN, Ferris Press Brick Company, Cole Brick Factory, Globe Press Brick Co., MISSOURI DIAMOND, LACLEDE St. LOUIS, SAGINAW, LFB WKS, Catskill Shale Brick and Paving Co., Eastern Paving Brick Co., Kaaterskill Paving Brick Co., Catskill Vitrified Brick Co., Tidewater Paving Brick Co.





June '07:

Hi, my home has been landmarked and I understand I will have to replace the same kind of brick that it was made with. Where can I purchase Hudson River Bricks and how much are they? Can you direct me to someone that supplies them if you can not help. Thanks so much
--elaine nickolan

Hi Elaine, Are you looking for new (unused)brick, or used? ... common or high quality face brick. I don't know where your home is located, or what brands of brick are incorporated in the structure, but you may try checking around for suitable used brick at one of those "Ground cover materials" dealers or landscape supply places. ... perhaps even a masonary supply yard. With respect to landscape supply yards I've seen one between Newburgh and Milton New York and there is a place along NY Rt 66 south of Ghent, NY. There are probably many yards but I'm just not familiar with them. I would strongly suggest that you take a few bricks with you to ascertain that they are the same size. Just buying brick because the names match does not guarantee the sizes are going to be the same.
--Fred Rieck

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Hi, Interesting site. Looking for information on a brick with the markings "NASSAU" looks old but I have no idea where it comes from. Thanks
--Lionel

Hi Lionel, The NASSAU marked bricks were made by the Nassau Brick Co. at Farmingdale, (Long Island)New York
--Fred Rieck

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Can you tell me anything about Palmer or Groesbeck bricks/pavers? We have several of them and have been unable to obtain any information about them. Thank you in advance
-- Katherine

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I have an interesting brick that has the word SOAP with a round indentation centered under the OA. It measures 9" long 2 1/2" tall and2 1/2" deep. Know anything about it? I found it in a pile of bricks on our property just outside of Minot North Dakota. Thanks
--Vanessa Nutt

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I came accross a brick in Northern NH with the plain inscription DRURY on it. I have read of a Drury brick company in Essex Vt, but was wondering if there might have been a Drury brick company in NH.
--John

Hello John, The International Brick Collectors Association listing of brick companies, compiled by Jim Graves does not list Drury among New Hampshire brick manufacturers. Drury seems to have exported much of its product into the surrounding "North Country" including northern NY State. There could be new data that may prove me wrong, but it would seem that development would have made itself known ten years ago. Sincerely
--Fred Rieck

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Great site, very informative. I certainly appreciate the work you put into it.
--Kevin

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My parents just tore down an old building in West Virginia. In the floor they found bricks with "Bessemer" or "Messemer" stamped in them. We would like to know more about them (where they were made...value, etc.) Could you please direct me to a resource that would help answer these questions? Thank you trememdously for your help! Sincerely
--Janet Fliegel

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I've dug up about 30 Laclede Sterling DP bricks from my yard. Do you have any information on these? The house was built in 1958, but I think the bricks were here before that.
--Lillian Gerlach

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We found three stamped bricks. One said C Co within an indent with raised letters. Another with Wa Co inscribed in it and a third with the same symbol as the Cary Brick Co, but on the front side. If you could tell me what they were, that would be marvillous.
--Summer S

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LOVE your website-- are you collecting Hudson River bricks that are not in your collection? We have XXX from Catskill (found where they dumped the rejects...also have a few nice ones) and Catskill bricks as well as a few others we picked up in the Catskill Creek that we do not know where they are from (it appeared to be the remains of a building) Thanks for sharing your great pictures!
--Nance Gross

From Don B., Webmaster:
Thanks for your nice comments, Nance. My "rule" for my personal collection is that I have to find the bricks myself. But if you want to email me pics of your "XXX" and other brix, I'd be glad to post them on this "Visitors' Collections" Page. Thanks for visiting the Web site!

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We were planting trees in our yard and came across a piece of brick with the imprint: 1926 Ohio State Brick Plant Convict made 1926 Ohio State. Was hoping to find more information and history of this plant.
--Eric and Lorna Balmert

These bricks were made at either of two of Ohio State Pen's satellite prisons. One was located just outside of Junction City Ohio, the other was just outside of Roseville Ohio. I have found them used for sidewalks, houses, and privies all over Perry County Ohio. I am guessing that they are end marked as opposed to being top marked, and should be an incuse marking instead of being embossed. Some of them are marked with an R or JC, but not all. Hope this helps
-- Josh

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I have a brick that has HHH on it. I live in the north central part of PA. Any clue where this came from?
--Jackie Bosek

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Hi, I am so glad to find a site on brick collecting. I just moved to upstate NY and saw a TV show called "Modern Marvels" about bricks. I learned of Tom Sullivan... brick collector and I would like to donate to his museum. Do you know him? or can you help me find him or another historical society to donate my historical finds. I just moved to NY and became interested in brick collecting. I only have about 12 from the Corning NY area but they are really worth preserving. I do alot of hiking in the area and that is how I've made my discoveries. Thanks,
--T

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Hi - just finished watching "bricks" on Modern Marvels (History Channel) and remembered I had some old bricks in my basement. The markings on them say "JWC" or "JWG". The letters are raised and sit within a cut-out area on one side of the brick. The bricks I retrieved in 1974 when my part of my old elementary school was destroyed by fire. The cornerstone to this particular building was placed in 1904. I did not see this brick in your vast collection and was wondering if you could help. Thank you very much.
-- bill gonzales

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I am 7 1/2 years old and I live on the Mississippi River in Minnesota. I found a brink near the shore that reads LACLEDE KING. Could you tell me anything about this brick and if it is worth any money? Thank you,
--Carter

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I have found some bricks with (Ohio) name on it. Does any one know what kind of bricks they are called? and where in Ohio were they made? also what they might be worth.
--Donna Nixon

Webmaster Note:
If you have any information for Bill, Carter, Donna or anyone else here, Contact Us.


May '07:

I am not a brick collector but I have a ton of brick that I have pulled from a walkway around my swimming pool, all of these bricks say Coffeyville V.B & T. Co on them. There are also several other brick on another walkway around the house and one that says KENYON where the Y in it is upside down a few that say Mcloud, & Chandler, C S B Co, Cleveland Vit Brick Co Oklahoma City, COF'Y V'L Vit B & T Co, A.P Green F.B.Co Empire S.M., and a couple with designs one that says cleveland and looks like a dog bone shape design, and another that has diamond shape designs with coffeyville on it. Anyhow I was just wondering if anyone has information on the one that says A.P. Green or the one that says Kenyon because I can not find any information on them. Should these unique bricks be taken out of the ground to help preserve them and aprox how old are they because they look like they are in great shape to have been here for 30+ years. It almost seems as though the owners of this home before us were slowly aquiring stamped brick and placing them in different places throughout the yard? Any information on the ones I have asked about would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
--Tina

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In March '07 I saw that John Nicholson posted a message about his grandfather and brothers that ran Nicholson Brick in Haverstraw, N.Y. My grandfather was Francis Nicholson from Haverstraw and I have a Nicholson brick. Is there any way you can pass on my email address to John? Some of Frank's brothers were Christopher, James, John, William. His father was John J. Nicholson and mother was Martha Green. Sons John and Willie I believe ran the grocery store in Haverstraw. My grandfather's brother, John, had a house on the water in Haverstraw and I remember visiting there when i was young. I would like to contact John Nicholson if he is open to the idea. Thank You.
--Mary Madden

From Don B., Webmaster: Here's the note John sent us back in March:
My name is John Nicholson. I believe my grandfather and his brothers owned a brick factory down in Haverstraw. If I remember correctly the names on bricks were: N Bros and Nicholson. I don't remember the N one that you show. I was a kid, so I am vague about it. I have a few Nicholson bricks, one is pictured HERE. If you would like it in your collection, please let me know. Any information you have on the Nicholson Brick factory would be appreciated.
--John Nicholson

Per her request, we provided Mary with John's email address and got this nice note from Mary:
Just wanted to thank you again, Don, I have heard from John Nicholson and this is all a delightful surprise. Thanks for making it happen.
--Mary

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Great site! I have a question about several bricks I found in the backyard which were part of an old creamery built in 1912. They say "philadelphia boiler works" There is one word missing after "boiler" and before "works". Any ideas about who this company was and any history on them?
--Mike R

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I found a brick right outside of Warsaw, IL. It is about the size of a normal brick, with one large capital "P" in the center of one face. Any info would be appreciated.
--Tom

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I'm looking for bricks to repair my chimney. They are "JMC" bricks from probably 1970. Thanks.
--Hilary Buckland

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What a great site you have put together. I have been involved with collecting bricks for way too long. When I moved 1000 miles from Lockport, NY to Tuscaloosa, AL my brick patio came with me. It is a long story, but every trip my Dodge Dakota truck made south from Lockport, it was nearly dragging the bumper on the highway due to the bricks in the back! Some 2,000 pavers were moved in this fashion. The urge to work with with pavers has surfaced again resulting in internet research and the discovery of your site. Keep up the good work!
--James Brewer

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Great site!! My family has been stone and brick masons going back to the Croton Dam. I just wanted to share with you some pictures of a few brick I had laying in the yard.



These brick came from my dad's house in Ossining. 40 years ago my dad and I took a trip to the other side of Cold Spring, New York with a trailer in tow. He knew of an old brick yard up there. We loaded the trailer up with I'm going to say at least 3000 brick which he used to veneer the the first story of our house. These brick have G & Sons on the face.
--Frank Palmietto

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My husband found in New Jersey brick one is Henry Maurer No 1, New York, next one is washburk ? I think, the last one has Mutton Hollow no.1 Woodridge, N.J. Do you know anything about these bricks? How old? Do they still make them? Thanks so much,
--Carolyn in TEXAS

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Where's the best place to go to find out about brick markings,i have found 3 bricks so far while digging up a graden area. they are marked with TUTTLE, RCO 40, EROO 4?, any info would be nice, thanks very much.
--Ed

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I am a brick collector in Great Britain , do you know of any useful links for here. (ps you site is great)
--Penny Vickers

Hi Penny. Here are some links and books for you to check out. Enjoy!
--Don B., webmaster

http://www.penmorfa.com/porthwen/
http://freespace.virgin.net/roger.hewitt/iwias/bricks.htm
http://www.cwmbran.info/brick_manufacturers.htm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/legacies/work/england/beds_herts_bucks
http://www.aggregate.com/pdf/bV_PI.pdf
http://viewfinder.english-heritage.org.uk/search/reference.asp?index=289&main_query=barn&theme=&period=&county=&district=&place_name=&imageUID=382
(scroll down to see pictures):
http://viewfinder.english-heritage.org.uk/search/easy_results.asp?index=289&main_query=barn&theme=&period=&county=&district=&place_name=

BOOKS:
Brunskill, R.W. (1990) Brick Building in Britain, Victor Gollancz/Peter Crawley
Brunskill & Clifton-Taylor, Alec, R.W. (1977) English Brickwork, Ward Lock
more books:
http://www.caerlas.demon.co.uk/cbm.htm

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Hi, I need help with 3 bricks we found near Ft Ann NY near Lake George at a demolition site.

a) DB Co
b) CB Co
c) RAM

Any ideas where these came from? Thanks!
--Ira

Webmaster Note:
Scroll down for a discussion of DB Co (and DBCO).

Our web site "guru" Fred Rieck replies:
Ira, Hi, The CBCo is probably that of the Champlain Brick Co of Mechanicville, NY.

The R.A.M.is a bit of a "mystery" brick. The 1928 Mechanicville city diectory features this entry: Moore,Pierce R., employee of the R.A.M. Brick Co.... Whereas the directory lists Cary, Duffney, and Champlain brick companies under the heading of Brick Manufacturers, the R.A.M. brick company was not listed. In another work, an on-line adaptation of - "History of New York State-Biographies", Richard A. Moore is indicated to be the son of Pierce ... and also the treasurer of R.A.M. Brick Co. of Mechanicville. (Richard A.Moore also being the treasurer of the Duffney Brick Co. and Vice President of the First National Bank at the time.)

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Hi, I have a Brick that is labeled "World's Fair" along the top with two "venn diagram" circles in the middle with inscriptions inside them. Below that is the date "1893". In the four corners are the letters from top left, (in counterclockwise fashion), R P C C. I believe that this is for the Columbian Exposition, could you give me answers to the who, what when, where, how, and why question? I am doing this for a history project, and I couldn't find anything about it except by asking questions to other sites like this. Thank you
--Stanley Moore


This is it, sorry it's not in to good of a condition, apparently it was created after the exposition as an award and wasn't used as an actual paved brick although the condition and mortar on the side would prove it so. It could have been created as advertising for the company, (Robinson Clay Products Company), and given out to the public for free possibly after having been torn up after the Exposition. The picture is of Columbus stepping out into the New World, and I can't decipher the other, it looks like some sort of award ceremony of a medal of some sorts.

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Looking for information on brick dug up in parents yard. One says Kane, the other Donnelly (not sure of spelling). Dad who is 90 remembers brickyards in Berlin Ct. about 40 bricks found but need to be cleaned. Not today's bricks-they are shaped different
--Carolyn Vickery

A reply from Fred Rieck:
Carolyn, Yes, about 25 brick companies are said to have manufactured brick in Berlin, CT and perhaps more if one counts the name changes these firms underwent. For more info I would suggest the local history section of some libraries near the locations of those manufacturers you may have interest in.

The Michael Kane Co. had plants in Middletown and Hartford, CT. Donnelly had plants in Kensington, Berlin and New Britain, CT, according to a listing generated by Jim Graves of the International Brick Collectors Association. This listing is a works in progress and is upgraded as new "finds" are brought to his attention.

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I would like to know where in Stony Point I can get bricks that were made by Reilly & Rose I need around 700 bricks, your help will be apreciated.
-- Greg Perez

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I found many bricks that were used in an old lumber mill oven back in the late 1800's. It looks much like the Excelsior brick but is very white and has the number 1 or the letter l since it is just a straight line in the middle. Can you tell me where it came from?
--Linda Ward

A reply from Fred Rieck:
Hi Linda, [No 1] has been moulded into firebricks manufactured by nine manufacturers located in 7 states, according to research and a listing developed by Karl Guerke. I have seen No 1, inside the outline of a "diamond", but not the "1" by itself inside the diamond. Not knowing where the brick was found makes it even more difficult to speculate where it was made.

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I have a photo of an old shovel loading a side dump hopper at Denning's Pt Brick.
--John Stewart

Webmaster Note:
John was kind enough to send us a copy of the photo and it can be found on our Dennings Point (DPBW) Page.

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Could you tell me were I can find some brick made 1939 to 1943 and the name printed on the brick ends (es) these bricks were used in Peekskill NY.
--Greg Perez

A reply from Fred Rieck:
Greg, STILES and SHARES are two brick brands whose names end in ES. These two popular brands were made in North Haven and Hamden, Connecticut. They are occasionally found in eastern New York State.

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I was down by the river again today. Found a couple more bricks. Check these out. All bricks were found on the Ammoosuc River except the
P & M. That brick was found in Concord, VT.
--Anthony


Here's the latest pic sent in by Anthony.

For info on NEBCo and P & M, Click Here. Scroll down for a discussion of DBCO.

Regarding DRURY: in "Brick Brands of the US," Jim Graves lists 2 DRURYs. One is William Drury, Grassy Point, NY. The other is Drury Brick Co in Essex Junction, VT. Both have raised letters in a "frog" which is what your pic shows. Yours is probably from Drury Brick Co since you found it in VT.

I found an article on the Web about the building of the 1957 Essex Junction High School:

...the Drury Brick Company, "Brick Makers since 1867," provided brick for facing for almost all of the outside of the building.

Also found this from: "A Brief History of Essex"

...in the southern part of town called Hubbelís Falls, business and industry grew around a succession of dams and mills built and rebuilt across the Winooski River. The first was constructed for Ira Allen by Abram Stevens who later built the tavern in 1820 now known as Lincoln Hall. In 1850 Hubbelís Falls was renamed Painesville after Governor Paine who brought the railroad through Essex, but by 1862 the railroad station and surrounding area were known by everyone as Essex Junction. During this period, J. K. Drury came to Essex Junction from Milton and started the Drury Brick Yard, which operated until the late 1960s

The Brownell Library in Essex Junction was built from DRURY Brick.

There's an article on DRURY in the Vermont Life issue for Autumn 1954

And according to Fun Facts: "the Drury Brickyard produced tons of bricks used not only in village houses (the Druryís brick house, rebuilt in the 1860ís still stands on Main St. directly across the street) but all over the world."
--Don B., Webmaster

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I know a spot in the middle of nowhere where it appears an old brickyard existed. the kilns and stuff are totally grown over and it is a totally forgotten place. i can't find anything about it. can u help. there are tons of bricks with the writing on them, i have one pic here, it says trenton firebrick co.
--gary moto

From your Webmaster:
A quick Internet search brought up a web site selling copies of a "Mercer County, Combination Atlas Map" by Everts & Stewart, 1875 with a History of the Villages and Townships of Mercer County. Included with this is a page titled: "The Trenton Firebrick and Terra-Cotta Works, O. O. Bowman & Co., Proprietors" Copies are $5 a page. (http://www.oldmapsetc.com/old-maps-new-jersey-towns.html)

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I just salvaged a brick from the demolition of the century-old Frieze Building on the University of Michigan campus (Ann Arbor). My grad school department was in the Frieze so the brick has sentimental value for me. The brick bears the legend "J.S.H." and I'd like to learn about its origins. Thank you.
--Rob Stone

From your Webmaster:
In "Brick Brands of the United States" Jim Graves lists "JSH" as the brandmark for John Strong Haggerty in Springwells, MI

From the Annual Report of the State of Michigan Geological Survey Division for 1924:

J.S. Haggerty operates two yards north of Michigan Avenue, east of Miller road and the Pere Marquette railroad crossing. Yard No.1, adjacent to Michigan Avenue, is equipped with two hand-dump, 7-brick molding machines. The total daily capacity is 68,000 brick. Yard No.2, 200 yards or so to the rear of No. 1, is equipped with one hand and one automatic molding machine. Capacity about 82,000 brick.
To see the complete report Click Here. J.S. Haggerty is mentioned on Page 82.

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Hello. I sent you an e-mail a little while ago about "NEBC." I recently found another brick with "DBCO" on it. There is no symbol in the middle. Just "DBCO." Do you have this one?
--Anthony

Webmaster Note:
Here's a pic sent in by Anthony. He told us he found the NEBCo (New England Brick Company) in the Amonoosuc River near Littleton, NH.

DBCO may be from Dunn, Buckley & Co , Haverstraw NY.

Fred Rieck comments:
I must say I'm not familiar with this brand of DBCO based upon the style of the letter "O" It's capitalized and the relationship of the "O"s height vs. its width. I do have some reservations about the identity of the DBCO as being that of Duffney's, because of the style of the letters "D" and "C" and the capital letter "O". The Duffney "D"s found in the non-CMBA symboled brick, at the Mechanicville plant site, resemble rectangles set upon their narrow side. The letter "C"s also featured square corners Two visits to the Duffney sight failed to bring to light any other DBCO / DBCo marked brick other than brick bearing the CBMA membership brand mark , and , the DBCo with the square cornered "D"s and "C"s. I would also tend to suspect that the Dunn Dolan and Buckley genre of brickmarks would be raised letter brick with out the frog. Dunn & Dolan subsequently marked their brick with raised letters / frog.

From your Webmaster:
Hi Anthony. No, I do not have "DBCO" without the CBMA symbol (CBMA="Common Brick Manufacturers Association.") If you can take photos of both this and the "NEBCo," I would love to post them here. Thanks for visiting the web site!

Here's a pic of "DBCO" with the symbol:


(Duffney Brick Co., Mechanicville, NY)

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I have a very old letter opener (brass handle) from the FERRIS BRICK CO. MANUFACTURERS. My great grandfather bought bricks for his farm sometime in the 1930's-1940's. He lived near Kilgore Texas. Can you tell me anything about these old bricks or the letter opener?
--hotl adams

Fred Rieck replies:
The FERRIS brick takes its name from the place, in Texas, where the company was located. I'm familiar with three trademark variations and I don't doubt there are more. Some FERRIS brick, (FERRIS HOUSTONs, for example) may be additionally embossed with two or three masted schooners. As for the letteropener, it's a promotional item. Many brickmakers gave out items as letter openers, small trowels, mirrors and paperweights bearing their names and logos.


April '07:

I am trying to determine if a brick that I found on site can be traced back to an old brewery in town. There are no markings, so is it possible to judge its age? If you have the time, I can send a picture.
--Joe Armstrong

Fred Rieck replies:
Joe, .... I don't think any one can tie a brick back to a particular building unless there is something really unique about the brick itself and the brick that are known to have come from that particular building. Dimension, shape, color and surface finish would be some factors to consider. At best we may say that a particular brick is of a type that could have been used at the time of the brewery's construction, OR ... the brick is too new looking (has a frog) for the age of the bldg. On the other hand there may have been an alteration and newer brick may have been brought in and used for the alteration - as bricking up an unwanted door or window

If the brewery was built before 1890 it is probable that the bldg brick were unmarked. On the other hand, how late did some brick manufacturers continue to make unmarked brick that wasn't an extrusion? I don't know.

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Does anyone have any information on Cleveland Block? I was wondering where I could find info about the company...Thanks
-- Tom

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Hi, I was recently revamping my yard, and buried a few feet under ground we came across a brick. Unlike anything any of us have ever seen before. On one long side theres a cross, on the other long side im assumeing its the holy ucarist(not sure of the spelling ,sorry) and the chalice, on the small end what looks like a deer hoof, and another form of chalice on the other end. The top part is concaved, almost dish-like. I am not sure where or who I could bring it too to get more information on it.Any information you could give me would be appriciated. Thank you!
--Michelle Poulin

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I found two bricks, but i believe they were manufactured by the same company, one says buckeye on the top, also on the side it says buckeye block. on the other one it says vitrified shale buckeye brick co., i was wondering if you know anything about these bricks, thanks..
--Mike Ross

A Reply from Fred Rieck:
Those Buckeye brick sound as if they are street paving bloscks. These bricks are made of pulverized shale which is heated (fired)to a very high temperature until the material begins to fuze together, almost becoming glass. These brick are impervious to water and (good ones) won't spall in freezing weather. Buckeye paving brick were made in Roseville, Ohio, and some other Ohio communities, where the Buckeye Brick Co. had plants.

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4-15-07 - Hello. I found a brick today in the Amonoosuc River near Littleton, NH. The brick reads NEBC. (New England Brick Company). It is in pretty good condition. The letters are clearly defined, however, it was in the river and has been rounded some. Are you interested in adding this brick to your collection?
--Anthony Egizi

A question:
Anthony, relative to the New England Brick Co brick you found in NH, .... is there an "O" following the "C"?
--Fred Rieck

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I love bricks. I'm 45 years old and I've been collecting bricks since I was 10. Unfortunately I was forced to leave my collection in the basement of my house that I sold in NY. I just didn't have enough space on the truck when I moved to NC in 2003. It torments me every time I think about it. However, I have started collecting again. And now my passion is antique pavers. I've obtained a few hundred pavers that lined the roads here in Wilmington in 1905. I've made a nice walkway on the side of my house and it's awesome. Some people don't get it but I have this obsession with bricks. Wherever I go I look for them and usually find some. This is a cool website. Thanx,
--Freddie Maasch

A Reply from Fred Rieck:
Hello Freddie, I was wondering where in NY you collected. From your paragraph it seems as if you left the State about the time I got started - more or less seriously. I was wondering if I could ask you a few questions relative to certain brick brands you may have come across in your travels within the Empire State. Sincerely, Fred Rieck

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Where could I look for info about the "King" Brick Co.? I believe they were located in Brooklyn NY. They also made bricks labeled "JBK".
--William Pierson

Webmaster Note:
In "Brick Brands of the United States" Jim Graves lists The KING Brick Co. as being located in Kingston, NY. He also lists KING brand firebrick being made by Queen's Run Refractories in Lock Haven, PA.

A reply from our web site "guru" Fred Rieck:
Bill, you pose an interesting question. Are you asking about a fire brick which is usually a white(ish) / buff / manila color, and larger, than the "run-of-the-mill" red(ish) colored building brick? I am not familiar with the "JBK" brick. Are its initials embossed into the same size and style KING brick that you are referring to?... and where did you "run" across this brand?

In another location than the King referenced in Grave's listing, there was a fellow named Patrick King, who began manufacture of building brick in Verplanck, NY in about 1871 expanding his operations until he was operating seven brickyards in the "downstate" area, before his death in July of 1903. These brick may NOT all have been marked KING.

The KING brick produced by the Kingston, NY, based brickyard, referenced by Graves, feature about three variations of frog/letter styles and include "jumbo" brick, all of which appear to have been made after 1903. In essence, it appears, to me anyway, that the upstate KINGs were made after the death of Patrick King ... although another King, or another manufacturer, perhaps thinking KING may suggest some sort of product supremacy, commenced manufacture using the KING brand name.

Kingston city directories I have combed through did not reveal the presence of a yard named KING. Neither did Heinrich Reis in his listings of brick manufacturers in his mineral industry reports. But no have no doubts, some manufacturer made lots of KINGs (building brick) here - perhaps well into the 1940s. A number of brick manufacturers had their offices in the NY metropolitan area and manufactured brick in leased or owned yards further up-river. Industries located outside a city's corporation limit may often escape inclusion in their directory.

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Hi, was wondering if you could help me with a brick i found. It says Catskill on it...was found at the bottom of Mt. Beacon this weekend. Any ideas? Thanks so much for a great website.
--Ira Chavis

Webmaster Note:
According to Jim Graves in "Brick Brands of the United States" the CATSKILL brand was made by the Eastern Paving Brick Co. in Catskill, NY. Does the brick you found have an indented "frog" or are the letters just raised from the surface?

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From your Webmaster:
Now in the works: The Olde Brick Store with a hand-picked selection of the best Hudson River lore, history and mystery. There are already some fine titles in there so check it out.

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Being a collector of spray paint cans, i find this hobby very interesting. i don't have the space to start a brick collection, seeing as how it seems there are quite a "few" styles to collect. i do however work for the nyc dept. of sanitation cleaning vacant lots and the like. i come in contact with many bricks. would anyone like me to grab some bricks to add to your collections? free of charge...
--J.STONE

Webmaster Note:
If anyone is interested, please use our Contact Form and I will forward your info to J. Stone. (We don't publish email addresses on the website to protect your privacy and to cut down on spam.)

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"The Gentleman From Ulster" excerpts you used are most informative and exciting to read. . . . as a relative Mayone with great interest I wish to obtain the entire "book" but have trouble locating one. . . .please advise. Your site is Great !!
--Rollie Mayone

Webmaster Note: we provided Rollie with Catherine Mayone's email address. Last year, Catherine was kind enough to send us a copy of "The Gentleman From Ulster" for use on our MAYONE page.

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I am attempting to find both pictures and information on a brick stamped "Sapulpa Pressed Brick Co.," one stamped "Tulsa" and one brick stamped with 3 stars, purchased in Eureka Springs, AK. Can you PLEASE provide me with information regarding these bricks? Thank you so very much.
--Debbie Jordan


March '07:

My publisher told me about your website - which is really quite good, and a real boost to the brick world. If there's any help I can provide, let me know.
--George Hutton

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I have brick that came from the old Hutton St. bridge, in Rhinecliff NY. The name on the brick is TIDEWATER. Can you tell me anything about them?
--David J. Mastri

A Reply from Fred Rieck:
Hi Dave, The TIDEWATERs were made in Catskill, NY. ... about 217 Main Street. They used shale hauled in by a narrow guage railway from shale pits in Cairo, NY.

Tidewater is the last of a succession of paving block manufacturers, which was listed on the tax roll in 1895 as Catskill Shale Brick and Paving Co. (some historians say 1890). In the ensuing years the company name changed several times to: Eastern Paving Brick Co by 1901, Kaaterskill Paving Brick Co. by 1906, Catskill Vitrified Brick Co by 1910, and Tidewater Paving Brick Co. by 1917. I'm chagrined to say I have no date for their (Tidewater's) demise.

Webmaster Note:
On the Web we found this in the NY State Archives:

Greene County Historical Society, Jessie Van Vechten Vedder Memorial Library Coxsackie, N.Y.
Reynolds-Cody-Sherman family papers, 1806-1967, 1806-1916:

The Reynolds family...were residents of Catskill and Windham. (Their) collection...contains a subscription list and photograph concerning complaint of smoke nuisance from the Tidewater Brick Company, Catskill, 1909-1910; and correspondence concerning genealogy and these papers, 1967.

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Hello, I found a brick today and was wondering if you could share some history behind it. It was stamped CALVERT. I have looked around on the internet and noticed Calvert can also be in reverse. And i believe this brick is from Calvert County Maryland... Thanks for your time and would love to hear more..
--Andrew

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I recently discovered a brick inside a stone fireplace. A collector thinks it is made by the Strassburg Fire Brick Co. in Ohio. It has the mark "Strassburg" on it. Anyone interested in it?
--Marc Nebozenko

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My name is John Nicholson. I believe my grandfather and his brothers owned a brick factory down in Haverstraw. If I remember correctly the names on bricks were: N Bros and Nicholson. I don't remember the N one that you show. I was a kid, so I am vague about it.

I have a few Nicholson bricks, one is pictured HERE. If you would like it in your collection, please let me know.

Any information you have on the Nicholson Brick factory would be appreciated.
--John Nicholson

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I am looking for bricks made by brickmakers John E. Herrell, John F. O'Neil; and Henry A. Herrell. They were head quartered at S Capitl c GA avenue in Washington D C during the later 1800s and early 1900s. Henry A. Herrel began in Virginia. They built buildings in the 900 block of Pennsylvania Avenue SE that may still be there. John and Arthur Herrell lived here with their families. Thank you.
--Carla Dunlap

Webmaster Note:
Carla, John Herrell is mentioned on Page 10 of this document from the DC Historic Preservation Office: Click Here

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I am an archaeologist in Texas and we recently recorded a site with the following brick:
First line = FERRIS
Second line = LIGHT PINK
Any information anyone can provide will be greatly appreciated. Thank You,
--Lance K Trask, Research Archaeologist, AR Consultants, Inc.

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Hello, I am the Project Coordinator for the installation and development of the Brickyard Disc Golf Course in Menomonie, WI. The land we have installed our course on is located at the site of the old Menomonie Brick Company. We have been working with the local historical society to get more information about the brickyards and have actually come across some very interesting photos as well.

I have contacted you to see if there is anyone I can communicate with to get further general information about the history of brickyards. We would very much like to theme the course to be historical in nature. Some things we would like to do include naming each hole and display it on our tee signs, have an informational website with the history of the brickyard, placing historic site signs around the course, and more. Our upcoming tournament is called the Brickyard Clay Classic and we will be playing one of our layouts, "The Kiln". We would like to make some custom artwork for discs to sell as a fundraiser and promote our course.
Any help would be greatly appreciated,
--Jason Hendrickson, Stout Disc Golf Club

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This is a question that someone can answer. When the sewer co. was digging in our front yard they dug up a brick with the name" sterling marietta o." on it. We do not remember a company by that name in the Marietta Ohio area. We know of Cisler. Does anyone have info on this company? Thank you.
--Gary & Teresa Schoolcraft

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I found a brick today near my home in NE Ohio that is very heavy with no holes and has Bessemer Block Youngstown OH on it and was wondering if you have any idea how old it might be. Do they still put brands on bricks today? If not, when did they stop doing so? thanks very much! just wondering if I found something from the history of my area.
--Shannon Inbody

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My grandson found a brick on the Long Island Sound beach which has TUTTLE stamped on it. Any idea if this may be a collector's item?
--Joan Isaacson

Website "regular" and fellow IBCA member, Fred Reick writes:
Most collectors would say, in one way or another, that brick are generally worth another brick. This may sound somewhat "flippy" until one realizes that most collectors don't buy their brick. They find them dumped or discarded or where a friendly demolition contractor will let them help themselves to what they can carry. Many collectors are "seniors" and collecting bricks offers them an interesting preoccupation with lots of sympathetic friends.

Secondly, many collectors swap their doubles and extras by the trunk, or trailer load for about as many others they don't have. ... and nobody keeps "score."

That is not to say some collector may not shop a brick he / she values for one of special interest to him. It is also not to say that some collectors won't buy a brick here and there if it fits a particular purpose. Many non-collector decendents of brick manufacturers, upon learning their ancestors were engaged in brick manufacture, may desire a brick from that company as a momento.

From your Webmaster: Here's a note we received in January--

My Great X4 Grandfather, founded the Tuttle Brick Company in Middletown, CT. Here's a history of it:
THE TUTTLE BRICK COMPANY
In 1842, Lyman Tuttle purchased a brickyard from George Gaylord and John Cornwall near the Newfield railroad station, about two miles north of the city area of Middletown, CT. His son, George Lyman Tuttle, assumed ownership of the business in 1846. When George took over operations, the company was annual making about 100,000 bricks. The company grew and in late 1800ís the yearly product of the yard was between 1,500,000 to 2,000,000 bricks. Upon George Sr.ís death in 1890, George Lyman Tuttle Jr. and his brothers, Willis, Wallace and Lewis, who were well versed in all its operations, assumed ownership of the company and served as its officers. The Company was officially incorporated in April 1896. Its annual production of high quality brick equaled competition and the demand afforded employment for more than one hundred men. The yards eventually produced a peak output of about fourteen million brick a year. Many of the finest buildings in Middletown and the Connecticut State Library in Hartford were made with Tuttle bricks. The bricks were also were sent by rail and ship throughout New England. In later years, changes in manufacture led to new additions such as sewer, pallet, and face brick. The company continued on until the depression, labor problems, and changes in building methods led to the demise of the brick industry during the 1930s. It is unknown when the company actually ceased operations."
--David Lyman Stack

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Hello! My name is James Robinson, and for 6 years I have been the artist and designer of the Athens Block Art Studio. We do ceramics, bronze, and pewter castings as well as making beautiful objects using historic brick images as subject matter. Thought you might want to take a look at our website. The link is www.athensblock.com.
--James Robinson

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I found a brick marked SHAMROCK on the riverfront in Peekskill. I did not find anything on your site. Do you think this is a local made brick? Is there anywhere else I can look for info?
--phil porteus

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My roots are in the Hudson Valley and my ancestors owned a brick building business. I am searching for historical information and am contacting you to see if you can provide any factual information on the business. To date I have not been successful in uncovering any historical information that I seek.

My grandfather, Sebastian Sommers Meade was born in Chelsea on the Hudson, NY. He was a founding member of the Chelsea Yacht Club and owned and operated a brick building business in the Chelsea, Fishkill, Pougkeepsie area for 30 plus years before terminating it in 1934. He inherited it from his father, James Van Duser Mead who inherited it from his father, Justice Mead who started the business in the Tarrytown NY area. The name Mead became Meade after James Van Duser Mead passed the business onto my grandfather.

Would your archives contain any information on the family brick business or, if not, can you suggest an historical source whom I can contact. Thank you,
--Jack S. Meade

A Reply:
Hello Jack. Thanks so much for sharing that piece of Mead / Meade history with us. As I understand it, the Mead came before the Meade, which I find quite interesting. Would you recall what brand names your grandfathers may have placed on their brick?

Somehow I gained the impression that your Grandfolk's yard may have been part of what is now the Castle Point Veteran's Hospital. Does that match any understanding that you may have come to? Again, Thankyou
--Fred Rieck

Webmaster Note:
Jack, here's a link to "Bricks In the Chimney" which you may have seen on the Chelsea Yacht Club web site. We see your grandfather listed as "S.S. Meadee" on this page. I have not been able to come up with any info on the web regarding a "Mead" "Meade" or "Meadee" brickyard. Let's hope our visitors can help here.

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I have several whole Shankey Bricks that I would be interested in selling. What might the market bear for these collectors items?
--Michael Czerniewski

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Hello, I'm a period architect/timber framer/structural mason. About to begin a very big single family residential project (150,000-200,000 bricks) and would like additional insight for this endeavour. Please reference my last project at claychapmandesign.com to better understand the scope of what we're about. Go to portfolio-structures-pierce/lee. Need wisdom. I am a sculptor and have only been laying brick for about 7 years; trying to avoid structural masonry pit falls.
--C. Clay Chapman


February '07:

Found some brick in Charleston, SC. They are over 120+ years old. They are from Baltimore Retort & Fire Brick Company (1884-1919). I'd love to share some pictures and get some feed back and some possible information.
--Dee Aukstikalnis

Webmaster Note:
Dee, we did not get your email address. Please send it to us via the secure Contact Form and I will reply with instructions on how to send us your pictures (which we excitedly anticipate!). (As always, we will keep your email address private.)

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Do you have a museum? When is it open? Thanks
-- James Potesky

From your Webmaster:
Hi James. No, we do not have a museum. But if you are in the NY area I heartily recommend the Haverstraw Brick Museum.

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Whoa! and I thought I had some bricks! Very cool brick collection. Loads of mine are from Beaumont, Louisiana, Texas and Texas/Mexico border towns. 9 different versions of Thurber bricks. One brick while Acme and Ferris were as one company for a while. ACME FERRIS (ACME ON TOP-FERRIS UNDERNEATH. Not too many of those around. Very interesting markings and name stamping showing family lineage of brick making families in Mexico/Texas towns. Kansas bricks, Oklahoma, and New York. My first brick is from an ASARCO facility in Tacoma Washington where I grew up. Idaho, WA co brick mfg. ...and my favorite brick - from Kodiak Alaska - - says SNOWBALL on it. Love your site!
--Nancy in Irving Texas

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Are bricks from the Tuttle Brick Yard readily available? A friend of my brother's was remodeling a house in Hyannis Port and found a Tuttle brick in the chimney. I'd like to purchase a couple if they are available. Thanks.
--Howard Tuttle

A Reply:
I would encourage you to be on the look-out for Tuttle brick. They appear to have been widely distributed by virtue of the frequency with which they seem to show up in rubble dumps and clean-fill operations from time to time in eastern NY.
--Fred Rieck

Webmaster Notes: For a photo of TUTTLE brick being used in the construction of the Connecticut State Library in 1909, Click Here.

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I would like to know if you have any bricks made by the Painton Co. during the 1920 or early 1930.
--j.jeneen

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My greatgreat uncle was a Joseph Mayone. I do know some things told to me by my great aunt - about his last wife and first wife. My great aunt, nearly one hundred told me he was indeed a mayone. It was a family secret too bad to say in its time. He sent money for his brother Peter (Pietro) and for his nephew (or brother) Joseph who arrived in some time between 1898 and 1903. If anyone could get back to me I would like to know what town in Calabria. Thank you.
--Dr. Dawn Hopper.

Webmaster Note:
Here's a direct link to our MAYONE Page. If you have any information for Dawn or anyone, comments or questions: Contact Us.

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Hi, I just finished a report and presentation on "brick" for a materials class that I am attending. I was fascinated to find out in my research all the history associated with bricks and especially interested in brand bricks.

I am eager and excited to start my own collection of branded bricks and am looking for advice and suggestions for this endeavor. How, who, where, costs, etc.-

Any information that you could give me to get started would be extremely appreciated and I would be greatly indebted. Much Thanks!
--Rob Nowak (Pacific Northwest)

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I am currently working on a project where some unstamped brick were discovered on the surface in Leon County, Florida. I have searched the internet and cannot find any information regarding when vitrified brick was first used in the area, or when it was invented. If you have any ideas or comments that may help me answer this question, I would greatly appriciate it. I am trying my best to date these bricks, but without a stamp I am finding it virtually impossible. I am pretty sure that it is vitrified, but I do not know the date that vitrified brick would have been in use in North Florida. Any information you can provide would be very helpful.
--Barbara A. Hines, Staff Archaeologist, PBS&J

Fred Rieck replies:
Ms. Hines, Hello. I just came across a photocopy of several pages copied from "University of the State of New York Bulletin #174" of "The Mining and Quarry Industry" by D. H. Newland. On page 28, and I quote,"The figures in the following table show the annual production of vitrified brick in New York State from 1897 to date (1913).

This report is, in essence, a report of paving brick industry in NY for the (then) last 17 years beginning with 1897. The idea is that perhaps if NY was making vitrified brick this early, others like Ohio, PA, Alabama, and West Virginia may have been too. I wouldn't be surprised if the manufacture of vitrified brick goes back several years further.

I have found NY made Catskill pavers in the riprap off Charleston, SC shores. It's not clear as to what purpose the vitrified brick you found, were used for. By that I mean, were they "common" building brick, face brick, paving brick or block? Some vitrified brick are unintentionally produced with nearly every batch of common brick made in scove kilns just because those brick nearest the fire are going to get mighty hot. Those brick further in from the fire tunnels, and not exposed to the flame, would be less likely to vitrify because the heat has had the opportunity to disperse or spread out throughout the stack. The imperfect brick were usually discarded because they were too distorted, discolored or "shrunken" (not of uniform size). In later years these "culls" became marketable when artistic minds realized that brick with molten ends could be mortared into the outer surface of a wall and give it a unique texture... i.e., rid the wall of an otherwise boring common brick look. Purposeful vitrification of brick renders the brick immune to water absorption.
--Fred Rieck

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I was very interested in reading the information in your site. I am trying to locate information about a man named Benjamin Powell Brown who was born in June 1805 and evidently patented a brick press in 1837. Might you have any information or knowlege about him or where I could look? Thanks for your time in responding.
--Viki Strong

Webmaster Note:
Google now has a Patent Search. But I could not find anything under "Benjamin Powell Brown." To see what comes up for "brick press 1837" CLICK HERE

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Has anyone heard of a brick with "Murphy" on it. I grew up in South Troy, NY; and we always called bricks "Red Murphy's". I'm assuming that it was because they were made by Murphy, but I can't find anything online about a Murphy brick.
--Mary

Fred Rieck replies:
Hi Mary. Checking through my listing of brick manufacturers from Troy city directories between 1851 and 1935, I found no mention of anyone "Murphy" in those years. I sort of suspect that the term is of a local ethnic derivation. I had not heard the term before, myself, though a number of the Troy area brick manufacturers appear to have Irish surnames.

Now, (and I say this "tongue-in-cheek") you may wish to pay a visit to the South End Tavern, keeping with tradition that ladies use the "Ladies Entrance" and perhaps inquire of the bartender. This was a pretty good eatery and restaurant the last time I was there. I'd go escorted of course. Perhaps you could let us know if you learned anything relative to 'Red Murphy

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Hello, Can you please tell me if it is hard to find original antique wood brick molds. My daughters kindergarten class is having parents career day. I am a bricklayer from Chicago, thought it would be fun for the kids to see how brick was once made (hands-on experience). I have never made brick, sites like yours and others gives excellent information on the process. Please let me know if you know were I could possibly purchase an antique wood brick mold. I know stores sell modern molds--looking for something that is authentic. Thanks for your time.
--Alan J. Stanevich(Beecher,Illinois)

A reply from Fred Rieck:
Alan, The difficult aspect of finding a brick mold would probably be finding one in time for your program. They tend to be offered on Ebay from time to time, and antique shops offer them too. I don't know of any available, at the moment.

The likelihood of an antique shop having a mold may depend, to some degree, on how much of the brick, made in the area, was made in molds or - extruded. Which, in the latter case, a long continuous length of clay "billet" was pressed out of a die and subsequently sliced into brick sized units before baking.

Most molds, I have seen, are of the multiple brick variety ... think of a long wooden box with 6 compartments (number of compartments vary) which are used in conjunction with a machine that packs the clay into them. These molds generally feature handles at each end, vent slots, steel rub strips and maybe a plaque with the brand name (in reverse) screwed into the mold compartment.

Most of these molds were burned up when worn out. Some wasted away in storage from wood rot and decay. Canvassing antique shops in or around a prominent brick manufacturing town in your area may prove positive. Hope this helps,
--Fred R.

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Hannacroix Creek & Paper Mills

Wouldn't it be more accurate to say that the Hannacroix Creek had three (3) paper mills -- two of which were located in the Town of Coeymans?
--Chuck Friday

From your Webmaster:
Thank you, Chuck! I have made the correction (and also added some more material) to the Coeymans Page.


January '07:

From your Webmaster:
Wow! What a year 2006 was for this little web site, a labor of love for me as part of my new, "crazy" hobby: brick collecting.

All your comments have been fascinating to read and it's been such fun to research answers to all your questions. Many thanks to our resident "guru" Fred Rieck for all his expertise. Fred is Member #969 of the IBCA (International Brick Collectors Association).

You may want to consider joining this wonderful organization. Membership info can be found HERE. I've just read the latest Journal and there's a whole section by Jim Graves where he answers brick identity questions from readers. Jim has an extensive collection of historical information and is the Librarian for the IBCA.

All the best for 2007 and Happy Bricking!
--Don Bayley (IBCA #1347)

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I was working in Hunter, NY. One of my co-workers come to me with a brick that had my last name on it. At the end of the day we went back with a 330 cat and found 6 more for me and my family, now we all have one. What is the the chance of that happening to find a washburn brick? I know it's nice to have one with my name on it but that took till 9:00pm in 2005
--john washburn

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I have an original letter dated March 23rd, 1899. Signed by Henry Maurer of Henry Maurer & Sons. They were brick makers in N. J. I can e-mail a copy. Do you know anyone who would have an interest in this letter. It is very beautiful. Thank you,
--Jeff Barker

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Please notify me of value of New Zealand bricks. (titled) I have some good ones. Thanks
--Sue

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Do you have any info on "Royal" fire bricks, I just found about 40 of them here in Southern California, but I can't find any info in regard to this being a California brick company. I checked in the web and on the California Brick link and have found nothing, any info would be great.
--Thomas Schmidt

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Hi, can you give me any info on a firebrick made in silverton colorado by otto mears with a star B? It is the symbol of a star B. Could have been made around 1900-1910. I have about 20 of them; would like to know info and if they are worth anything, thanks
--tomey tynes

Fred Rieck replies:
Tomey, I too have a "[star] B", but it is not a firebrick, it is a red building brick. Several people have told me that it (mine) is a New Hampshire brick. I also know that red "[star] B" building brick have been found out "west" in California, I believe. I don't recall who/where I got mine from.

We are wondering if there were researchable documentation on how the brick may be linked with Otto Mears. It's possible that the size and style of the [star] are quite different since the star image was a symbol that many brick manufacturers used.

Tomey writes:
Fred, thank you so much for your response, here is a picture. mine is a whitish tan with black specks in it, otto mears lived here in silverton, co, his house is still standing, and the brick foundry was on cement creek just above the town park, there is some documentation, i think it is in the book many more mountains, vol 1 by allen naussman, thanks again for getting back to me on this, hope the picture is ok,
--thanks, tomey

Fred Rieck replies:
The photo is a bit blurry but still tells us a great deal of what we wanted to know. Predicated on your information I'm inclined to suspect my [star] B may be of the same "pedigree" as yours, albeit that mine is a red common building brick with the letter "B" resembling the letter B as written here, whereas your photo indicates the inner spaces of the "Bs" lobes look as if they are little squares.

Is the [star] B on your brick raised above, or, embossed into the surface of the brick? Its hard to tell in the picture.

Would you have an idea what the letter "B" signifies?

Thanks again, Toomey, for your indulgence.
--Sincerely, Fred Rieck

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I recently became interested in brick collecting, and as my small collection grows, I find myself wanting more info on the bricks, their history, location, etc. Is there a book that exists for brick collecting? I live in California so much of the history of bricks in the U.S. is east coast based it seems there is very little info on stamped bricks based on the west coast, any ideas where to start? Thank you,
--Thomas Schmidt

Webmaster note:
A good west coast source is Dan Mosier's web site: California Bricks. Books on bricks are hard to find. Many are out of print but check libraries and do some searching in local history books, trade journals, city directories, and newspapers. For California and Pacific Northwest bricks, Dan recommends an excellent book by Karl Gurcke entitled "Bricks and Brickmaking," University of Idaho Press, 1987. Also the bulletins and reports of the California Division of Mines and Geology. Dan's References will give you some more ideas.

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A colleague and I are starting a research project on the sources of historical (pre-1950) brick that were made at or imported into Phoenix, Arizona that hopefully will include chemical analysis of brick and clay samples--this should help to identify unmarked bricks found at a site. Do you have any information on these subjects, or can you suggest any sources of information? A similar project was done for a brickyard in Tucson and we have that report, and we are searching through historical documents (City Directories, newspapers) for the names, addresses, and other info on brick manufacturers. I'll be happy to share our results when we have something. Thanks for your help,
--Jim Cogswell

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Webmaster Note:
If you have additional information for Jim or anyone, comments or questions: Contact Us.

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Thank you for your help identifing A.E.A. I am not aware of any family connection to William Underhill. I do have to say though that when I found out there was an Underhill brick yard a few years back, my interest in brick collecting grew from a small interest to 64 bricks at present.
--Tim Underhill

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I have many bricks that were found in Hagerstown, Maryland. They are the concave style with the word "CALVERT" stamped in them. Any idea of the history of this brick? I also have extras if anyone wants one. Thanks for your help.
--Rick Lanning

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I have an old brick that was from the Historic Route 66 highway, New Mexico area. It is stamped "COLE" is reddish in color and is intact with no breaks. Would anyone be interested in it?
--Nathaniel Brown

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In regard to the below message, Standard Brick Company was located where the current Wayne Township (NJ)DPW yard now sits. The clay pit is now a pond and is still there. Standard was known to exist as of 1904 according to "The Clay and Clay Industries of NJ" publication by Ries and Kummel. The site had earlier brickyards begining in 1870. There were approximatel two dozen brickyards in the Mountain View area (Wayne, NJ) from as early as 1830 to as late as 1961, and these yards were known for supplying common bricks to many large buildings in the historic Paterson Great Falls Mill District (Silk City) and surrounding areas. I doubt your SBCo brick is from Standard, as Standard usually printed their entire name (ie "Standard"). There was a Sommers Brick Company in the same 1904 survey located in Bakersville, NJ (just northeast of Trenton - another great user of bricks) which might likely have supplied your location in South Jersey.
--Fred Platt

November '06:

Hi. We just pulled down the structurally unsound chimney from the back of my turn of the century house in South Jersey, and some of the bricks inside are stamped S B Co (raised letters in a recessed rectangle) which, through limited internet research, I've found might be the Standard Brick Company of Mountain View, NJ. I can't find any info on that company or on this brick on the internet. Wondering if somebody could steer me in the right direction. Thanks! Matt
--Matt Lally

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After visiting Bannerman's Castle located on an island in the Hudson river just south of Newburgh, N.Y. I saw bricks lying around the ruins. One brick was labled A.E.A. I have not been able to figure out where it was made. The other bricks at the site came from Denning's Point just north of the castle. Thank you for any help you can give me.
--Tim Underhill

From Fred Rieck:
Hi Tim, The A.E. A. brickmark "ties" into Aaron E. Aldridge, a brick manufacturer located in Dutchess Junction.

A.E.A. is listed in city directories as early as 1887. I can't tell you just when the A.E.A. marked brick actually came into production. I suspect the brick you found has a "frog" that is a raised border surrounding the name. A later, 1896 directory entry lists Aaron as being affiliated with Aldridge Brothers (a/k/a Aldridge Brothers & Company), also brick manufacturers - the brother likely being George L. Aldridge.

Brick marked A.B.C. (the letter C having a unique segmented form), have been found comingled with ALDRIDGE scrap. There are several manufacturers that marked their brick with "A B C" making it difficult to ID them with out seeing the them.

Aldridge Bros. Co. is listed as early as 1890

From your Webmaster: found this on the Internet--

From 1915 Beacon Census, Dutchess, NY:
Street     # Name            Relationship R S Age Born Yrs. C/A Occupation Class 
North Ave 22 Aldridge, A. E. Head         W M 64  U.S. CIT.     Brick Mfg. OA 

Tim, are you at all related to the brickmaker William A. Underhill?
For a great web site on Bannerman's CLICK HERE

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My Great X4 Grandfather, founded the Tuttle Brick Company in Middletown, CT. Here's a history of it:

THE TUTTLE BRICK COMPANY
In 1842, Lyman Tuttle purchased a brickyard from George Gaylord and John Cornwall near the Newfield railroad station, about two miles north of the city area of Middletown, CT. His son, George Lyman Tuttle, assumed ownership of the business in 1846. When George took over operations, the company was annual making about 100,000 bricks. The company grew and in late 1800ís the yearly product of the yard was between 1,500,000 to 2,000,000 bricks. Upon George Sr.ís death in 1890, George Lyman Tuttle Jr. and his brothers, Willis, Wallace and Lewis, who were well versed in all its operations, assumed ownership of the company and served as its officers. The Company was officially incorporated in April 1896. Its annual production of high quality brick equaled competition and the demand afforded employment for more than one hundred men. The yards eventually produced a peak output of about fourteen million brick a year. Many of the finest buildings in Middletown and the Connecticut State Library in Hartford were made with Tuttle bricks. The bricks were also were sent by rail and ship throughout New England. In later years, changes in manufacture led to new additions such as sewer, pallet, and face brick. The company continued on until the depression, labor problems, and changes in building methods led to the demise of the brick industry during the 1930s. It is unknown when the company actually ceased operations.
--David Lyman Stack


December '06:

I have found a number of firebricks at a local Birmingham, Alabama iron mine site and would like to date these if possible. Some of the bricks are known to be local, like the Birmingham Firebrick Works, and H&W (Harbison & Walker). Some other names are Anglo Saxon, _ _ _ _ & Bosh, Excelsior, and Bene_ _ _ . Any leads would be welcomed.


I have just determined that the B'ham Firebrick Wks was in operation in 1886. I do not have photos of the other bricks, or more correctly the pieces! I could go back out in the field and photograph them if it would help identify a time period of mfg.
--Robert Yuill

From Fred Rieck:
Hi Robert... looks like you found a collection all in one place. According to "Brick Brands of the United States", a compilation dated 1/26/99 by Jim Graves, the librarian for the International Brick Collectors Association, Anglo-Saxon is a brand of brick made by the Harbison-Walker Co. of Portsmouth, Ohio. No manufacturing years for this brand name are given in this listing.

BENEZET is a trade name of H-W Refractories Co. of Pennsylvania, according to a thesis written by Karl Gurcke of Skagway, Alaska. Its use is listed as being the years of 1873-1942. It was "Officially" registered with the U.S. Patent Office in 1894 according to the document. Often, in the case of Pennsylvania fire brick, these names relate to the geographical area from which the brick's clay is taken.

EXCELSIOR was a brand name used by several manufacturers. According to Mr. Gurcke's analysis of American Refractories Institute publications: Henry Maurer & Son of NJ -1921: Alabama Clay Products Co. - 1927-1942; Seaboard Refractories Co. of NJ, - 1935; and Pacific Clay Products Co of CA - 1921-1942.

HEARTH & BOSH, again according to Gurcke, is a brand mark of the Golden Fire Brick Co. of Colorado, in use 1921-1930.
--Fred Rieck
Happy New Year - Everyone

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I have found a brick from Donnelly Brick Company while walking around an old homestead in Groton Connecticut. It has the same markings as the one on your homepage (Don B Co). I was wondering if you could give me information about the company and possible year it would have been fired. Thank you for any information.
--David Ledlow

From Fred Rieck:
In a book entitled "State of Connecticut State Geological and Natural History Survey," Bulletin No.4, "The Clays and Clay Industries of Connecticut" by Gerald F. Loughlin" S.B., 1905, pg.92, there is a listing of brick mfg'rs which lists (under Berlin District) "Donnelly's"

I suppose we could say Donnelly was in business in 1905 and perhaps earlier.

From your Webmaster:
Ron Rose says they were located in Berlin and Kensington, CT.
Ron has some good pics (including DON.B Co and DONNELLY) Here.
The company was evidentally still around in 1965. Found this on the web:

ELJAM MASON SUPPLY, INC.
v.
The DONNELLY BRICK COMPANY.
 
Supreme Court of Errors of Connecticut.
 
March 10, 1965.
Page 545
Jason E. Pearl, New Britain, with whom was Israel Nair,
New Britain, for appellant (plaintiff).
[152 Conn. 484]
D. Stephen Gaffney, New Britain,
with whom was Bernard D. Gaffney, New Britain, for appellee (defendant)

(Eljam sold Donnelly Brick product in NY State.)

==========

I have an old brick and stamped on the end there is an X that crosses the entire top half, or it is supposed to be a diamond with the letters S.C.M. CO. On the bottom I can make out the word GRAVES and above that DUNN. PTENT. the ends tapered from the center to top and bottom sides are a rough scallop on one side, smooth on top and bottom. It is from my mother's old home place in L.A. (lower Alabama) I believe it was made shortly after the War of Northern Agression. Can you help me identify?
--Joey Douan

Fred Rieck replies:
Graves is known for manufacturing street paving block. DUNN PATENT appears on the ends of street pavers made by numerous manufacturers. My recollection is that the term refers to the process in which the pavers are extruded and cut.

In DUNN PAT marked brick I have seen the ends are marked with the manufacturer by an embossing wheel as the brick is extruded. Since the extrusion is cut cross ways (perpendicular)to its flow, the process as I understand it, does not allow for the manufacturer's name to appear in the cut face. Often the embossing wheel gets "out of sync" with the cutter and the marked end will show the end of the last word and the beginning of the next. The "X" may be be the end of the last "diamond" and the beginning of the next. If there were any letters within the "diamond" they would appear on the "outsides" of the "X" perhaps as: M.CO X S.C. The "scallop" pattern may be the mark left by the motion of the cutter / slicer. Joey, if you could send us a photo, that would be great!

I'm afraid that I'm not familiar with S.C.M.CO. The nomenclature suggests that GRAVES Shale Brick of Birmingham, Alabama may have been in the process of a name change or consolidation. We could play with the initials, that is Southern Clay Manufact'g for example, but be cautious we don't confuse a name "invented" for the sake of convenience with the real "McCoy."
--Fred Rieck

==========

My great grandfather and great uncle had a brick yard at Stony Point before 1869. Their names were Walter F. B. Gurnee and Abram S. Gurnee. Do you know anything about them?
--Carmen Marzano

From your Webmaster:
Found these items on the web: "In any survey of the substantial enterprises of Hanford, Kings County, California, the Gurnee planing-mill is certian to attract attention. Its output in windows, doors, mouldings and bank fixtures aggregates $60,000 yearly. The guiding spirit of these enterprises is Brewster S. Gurnee, who came to Hanford from the city of Fresno in December , 1891. Born in Stony Point, Rockland County, New York, May 26, 1859, a son of Walter F. B. Gurnee and a grandson of Mathew Gurnee, natives of the Empire State, he traces his ancestry to one of the Pilgrim fathers. Walter F. B. Gurnee, a farmer and a brick manufacturer, served the Federal cause in the Civil War as a private soldier sixty days, then was sent home because of ill health and died in his fifty-sixth year. He married Mary M. Smith, also a native in New York state, who died at Rye New York at the age of seventy-six."
(History of Tulare and Kings Counties, California with Biographical Sketches - Los Angeles, Calif., Historic Record Company, 1913, pp. 791-792, Transcribed by Kathy Sedler)

1834, Methodist Episcopal Church at Stony Point built and dedicated, on land donated by Matthew Gurnee and his wife.
Churches and other houses of worship of Rockland County, NY, past and present
http://rocklandgenealogy.org/rcchurches.htm

==========

I'm currently looking for a certain brick...The brick was made under Unterwagner Brick. Do you have any info on these bricks, or the company?
--Justin Unterwagner

==========

this is joe again---
the JJJ brick I have is not raised on the sides-- flat all around with the JJJ s on it. I will get a picture of it also is it normal on such a job to have about 20 different bricks on one job? have a great day
--joe ackermann

From Fred:
In response to your inquiry relative to 20 brands of brick on one job, it does seem like a lot. On the other hand the scope of the "job" at the time the particular brick were being used may be an important factor. I recently visited a demol of the Fleetwood body plant. The painted sign on the gable end of one building bears a date of 1906. Supervisory people around the demol tell me the place was built about 1906 but it was added to at various times explaining the variety of brick marks they found.

1850 is early for marked building brick. Certainty of when a manufacturer began marking his / her brick is lacking. We know JJJ used a variety of marking variations through the years, and we may be able to put them into a sequence predicated to a large extent, upon the styles used by others. It may be a matter of what letter fonts the mould makers found in vogue. Depending on the size of the job it's possible that one manufacturer may not have the capacity to produce all the needed brick in the time required, thus making it necessary for the builder to shop around to get the quantity he required. Some structures were built at different points in time. The old brickmakers were out of business. New people took their places. There may have been labor strikes at the brick plant forcing builder find other sources. However, using brick of different manufacturers, can present problems. And at least one mason I knew was quick to point them out in no uncertain terms.
--Fred Rieck

==========

Can you tell me anything about Alta bricks?
--Carmen

Fred says:
Hi Carmen, according to Jim Graves in "Brick Brands of the United States," 1/26/1999, there was an ALTA (all capital letters) marked fire brick which was produced by Gladding, McBean & Co. of South Gate, California. The last I looked, there were a number of Gladding, McBean brick displayed on Ron Rose's Website: rosebrickyard.com under California.
--Fred Rieck


November '06:

Hi. We just pulled down the structurally unsound chimney from the back of my turn of the century house in South Jersey, and some of the bricks inside are stamped S B Co (raised letters in a recessed rectangle) which, through limited internet research, I've found might be the Standard Brick Company of Mountain View, NJ. I can't find any info on that company or on this brick on the internet. Wondering if somebody could steer me in the right direction. Thanks! Matt
--Matt Lally

==========

My husband John's grandfather, Joseph Boucher was a brickmaker in Worcester, MA from 1884 to 1916. The brickyard was owned by Mr Dana in the mid 1800s, and then by Edmund Paquette. In the 1890s Joseph went from being a brickyard worker to a full partner with Mr.Paquette. Later he went on to being sole owner, despite the fact that he did his "ciphering" on his fingers. At one point the bricks were labeled, "Worcester Brick Co." The brickyard was between Plantation and Clarendon Streets on Crow Hill in Worcester, MA. About 1916 when the brickyard shut down, Joseph had $22,000 and 22 horses. The hill was formed by the glaciers 10,000 years ago. The exposed white hard pan clay escarpment is a significant geological formation that is undeveloped in 2006. Most of the land has been vacant since that time and is now being preserved as open space. Eight of us just scouting out the area last week and brought home a few artifacts including brick bats, pieces of slate, 5 inch pieces of thin metal and what looks like fused rock. We could use some help in identifying what we found and in knowing what to search for during future expeditions. Got any suggestions for us? I have photos of what we found.
--Therese Boucher

==========

I live in an old house in Mohegan Lake, N.Y. that is on the 1867 Atlas maps. I recently had to have my chimney redone (from roof level up -- and the portion re-done might not be that old).

But, just to see, I saved a few of the bricks. They seem to say O.B.& M.C on them. Do you know what this means, as I do not see it listed in any of the brickworks you discuss?
--Mike Saltzman

Fred Rieck replies:
The OB & MC could be either O'Brien and McConnon or O'Brien and McConnel, both said to have been manufacturing in Verplank. I'm getting this information from a listing found in "Within these Gates" published privately by Dan DeNoyelles, a former Rockland County historian and decendent of the DeNoyelles brick manufacturing family. In DeNoyelles' listing of brand marks, it indicates that ... McConnon is associated with the brandmark of O & MC (not OB & MC) and firm was in business in 1890. McConnel does NOT have a brandmark associated with it and was in business in 1899. I know that OB & MC marked scrap brick have been found in Verplank having raised letters but without the typical rectangular recess; AND, with the OB & MC in raised letters, situated within a rectangular recess.

All this suggests several possibilities. First: the difference of featuring a "B" after the "O" determines if O'Brien & McConnel made it, or O'Brien & McConnon. Second possibility: there never was a second McConn... but a typo error, somewhere in the written materials, that DeNoyelles researched, caused McConn... to be spelled two ways thus making it appear there were two manufacturers. This, I have found, happened more than rarely. Third possibility: O'Brien changes partners but keeps the moulds as is. The matter of a missing "B" is just a "quirk."

Sorry for all the ambiguity, but that's what we run into when trying to ID brick.
--Fred Rieck

==========

Hello, I am working at an old church in NYC during some of the demo I have found brick with the marking J J J on them the building was built around 1800- 1850. Be well
--joe ackermann

A question for Joe:
Joe, does the JJJ brick you found in the church demol have a rectangular recess (called a frog) in which the letters are set? Do they look like this?


Or, are the letters not in a recess and raised from the surface of the brick? Also, are the Js very large?
--Fred Rieck

From your Webmaster:
You most-likely have a brick made by Juan Joseph Jova. Go to our "Collection" page and scroll down to the "Js." You'll see a pic of a J J J brick. Click on the brick and you'll be taken to a page of old pics of the Jova yard. And thanks for visiting the web site!

==========

Good Day all. I am looking for a picture of a Hibberd Brick. The brick company was in Kearney, Nebraska. If anyone has any information on this company, please post or email me. Thanks for your interest in brickcollecting and Happy Bricking.
--Chris IBCA#1141

From your Webmaster:
Hi Chris, You may have come upon this web site: http://bchs.kearney.net/BTales_199311.html. It states, "In Kearney the only brick firm to survive the depression of the mid-1890's was the Hibberd Brick Company. George W. Frank, in July of 1889, became the owner of all the brick companies in Kearney, including Richard Hibberd's yard. The companies apparently continued to manage and operate the yards under Mr. Frank's ownership. On January 30, 1893, George W. Frank deeded the yard back to Richard Hibberd."

For a pic of the Hibberd kilns, go here: http://bchs.kearney.net/BTales_199311.html (and scroll down).

For a pic of the yard in 1908, go here: http://bchs.kearney.net/BTales_198202.htm

From: http://www.kancoll.org/books/andreas_ne/buffalo/buffalo-p6.html

"RICHARD HIBBERD, manufacturer of brick, builder and contractor, opened his brick-yard in August, 1880, which comprises eight acres of ground. He employs from sixteen to fifty men in the manufacture of brick, with a capacity of 40,000 hand-made brick per day, and about twenty-five men in building in the business season. He erected the brick work of the State Reform School, High School Building, Presbyterian Church, store buildings for L. R. More, store for C. R. Finch, and Roberts Bros. new bank building, and a large dwelling for ex-Mayor Campbell, also the deaf and Dumb Asylum at Omaha, Neb., all of which he has erected since he settled in Kearney. He has made and laid 2,500,000 brick since living in the latter city. He was born in North Staffordshire Eng., April 12, 1845. Came to America in June, 1863. Was married in England, in 1870, to Miss Emma M. Gould. They have five children--John Clement, Charles Francis, Elma M., William Eris and Lucy. He enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Illinois Regiment, and served thirteen months during: the late rebellion."

==========

I have an old garage, I'm told the oldest in my town. There are some bricks that have came loose and have the name SLIGO stamped on them. Do you have any information about this brick...where it was made and any information about the time it could have been made?
--Chad

Webmaster Note:
On the Web we have found an 1877 map:
"Sligo Fire Brick Works" John Porter & Co., Hancock Co., W. Va., opposite Sloans Station ... (... compiled & drawn for the publishers by E.L. Hayes, assisted by E.F. Hayes, C.M. Beresford, assisted by S.A. Charpiot, F.L. Sanford, J.H. Sherman. Published by Titus, Simmons & Titus ... Phila. 1877 ... Printed by H.J. Toudy & Co. ... Oldach & Mergenthaler Binders ...)
(Sources: http://www.davidrumsey.com/maps490.html http://www.wvculture.org/History/abphot.html)
To see the map CLICK HERE

==========

My family is from Buffalo, Kansas and as a child I would always be picking up bricks and bringing them home. My mother would make me leave them at my aunts house. Now as an adult my yard is decorated with the bricks that I found so wonderful as a child. I was told that my grandfather was the super when the plant was still in operation. I would greatly enjoy reading as much as I can.
--Mary Bratrud

Webmaster Notes:
For info on the Buffalo, Kansas Brick Plant,
Click the Brick:
Buffalo Kansas Brick

In 1954 Acme Brick Co. broke into the Kansas-Missouri market with the purchase of Buffalo Brick and Tile. For a 1960 picture of the Acme Brick Co, Buffalo, Kansas CLICK HERE. Acme is still in business today and is owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway.

For pictures of other Kansas brick yards CLICK HERE.

==========

I picked up a brick today for my sister. KOOKEN is embossed on it. An article by Jack Teagarden "Brick Collecting are you at risk?" mentions Kooken - just wondering what info you might have about KOOKEN - thanks.
--Jennie Brady

Webmaster Note:
From the Arlington (Texas) Journal, Friday March 6, 1936
"http://www.pub-lib.ci.arlington.tx.us/research/localhist/journal1936.DOC"--
J. A. KOOKENíS BROTHER DIES
C. E. Kooken, 70 years of age, brother of J. A. Kooken, passed away at the Kooken old homestead at Ferris, Ellis County on Wednesday, March 4 at 4.00 p.m. Funeral services were held on Thursday at 3:00 p.m.
Mr. Kooken was the son of R. B. and Jane I. Kooken, pioneers of Ellis county and has been prominent in business, civic and religious affairs of Ferris for many years. He organized the Kooken Press Brick Company which later was merged with the Ferris Press Brick Company.

From "http://www.rootsweb.com/~txechc/comm.html"--
Ferris is best known for its brick manufacturing plants which fueled much of the city's growth during the early 20th century. The first brick plant, the Atlas Brick Company, was established by T.J. Hurst around 1900. A year later Thomas J. Weatherford organized the Ferris Press Brick Company. By the early part of the 20th century, six brick plants were in operation in and near Ferris and they produced from 300,000 to 350,000 bricks daily. According to Texas Magazine (1911 4[l]:82), Ferris, "in proportion to its population is the biggest brick manufacturing town in the world.' The six companies consolidated in 1923 to form the Ferris Brick Company.

Here's some info on the Cole Brick Factory and the Globe Press Brick Co.. For a history of brickmaking in the Ellis County (Ferris/Dallas) area CLICK HERE.

==========

My wife and I are scuba divers in southwest Florida who have found a ship wreck we would like to determine the origin of. It is a stern paddle wheeler steamship. On that wreck we have found fire brick around the boiler area and thought you might help us identify/date these brick. One is stamped with: MISSOURI DIAMOND The other is stamped with: LACLEDE St. LOUIS. I have put together a web site: www.Contrails.com\paddlewheel to gather information on the wreck in an attempt to determine its origin. Any information you could forward would be greatly appreciated.
--Dave Brink

Our website "guru" Fred Rieck replies:
Hi Dave, finding an old ship as you have has got to be exciting. My navy experience is probably not sufficient for your needs but we may be able to help out with the brick aspect. Missouri Diamond is a trade name used by the Missouri Fire Brick Co of Missouri, and according to Karl Gurcke's research of American Refractories Institute publications, the brand name was in use in, or about the years of 1921 - 1930. The Laclede St. Louis brand is also a Missouri brand used in and around the time frame of 1921 - 1942, again using Karl Gurcke research of American Refractories Institute publications. Firebrick aboard ship would likely be used to line the fireboxes of the boilers. AND they would probably be set with a special cement. I would suspect they would remain in the firebox, even if the boat sank.

Now, let's examine the firebrick you saw in the debris field. Were the brick edges sharp or worn and ragged? Was there any evidence of cement on the brick ... stuck or plugging the embossed lettering? Unused brick would tend to be clean and devoid of cement or mortar. Unused brick could be cargo or pending use in relining the fireboxes. I suppose you would have to figure how much brick would be more than plenty to reline the fire boxes. Your sketch of the boiler denotes a missing wall section of rectangular shape. A blown boiler shell or casing would bring to mind torn metal bent outwards, sheared or popped rivets, distorted curvatures at rivet holes. Another scenario ... the boat is moored and undergoing repairs to boilers. A storm or flood rips the boat loose from its mooring and drives it aimlessly from river to sea. As for the boat being upright or upside down, I was wondering if the placement of the paddle wheel shaft bearings in those "supports with reduced size ends" may offer a clue. I noticed that they are not centered within the width of those support arms, and wonder if the bearing would typically be installed nearer to the top ... or bottom of the support arm on such boats. Have fun.
--Fred Rieck

==========

My Uncle Carl turns 90 in January. He's lived in Sagainaw, Michigan all his life, except for WWII, when he served in the US Army in Europe. I will be presenting him with a beautiful old paving brick taken from a demolished road in Grand Rapids, where I live. The brick is a rich shade of reddish brown; it's 4" x 8 1/2" by 2 1"2". In bold upcase letters it has SAGINAW stamped into the face of it. Any idea how old it might be? When were brick roads made? My grandfather saved a wooden brick that was used in a road in Detroit; it was was replaced with fired clay bricks. Thanks for any info you might have.
--Mike Burton

==========

I RECENTLY CAME UPON WHAT APPEARS TO BE THE REMNANTS OF AN OLD FALLEN CHIMNEY IN THE WOODS IN HUNTSVILLE, AL. A COUPLE OF THE BRICKS HAVE THE LETTERS LFB WKS ENGRAVED ON THEM. THE OTHER BRICKS ARE MORE RED IN COLOR AND MEASURE 8 3/8 BY 4 BY 2 /14". COULD YOU GIVE ME ANY MORE INFORMATION AS TO WHERE OR WHEN THEY WERE MANUFACTURED? THANKS FOR YOUR TIME,
--DANE SHULL


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